7+ Books by Dan Brown

 

Dan Brown is the man who almost single-handedly reverted an entire generation to pages and printed words that beautifully speak of history. Even though his first three novels could not create a buzz, the 2003 cult classic “The Da Vinci Code” broke all possible literary records and became one of the bestselling novels of all time. The book brought Brown and his kind fictional alter-ego,  Robert Langdon the cool, composed and knowledgeable Harvard Professor and symbologist, to the limelight of the world. The book has ever since topped all Dan Brown bestsellers remained among any top ten ‘Most Sold Books Ever’ list, and that too one of the very few modern literature to be there – and rightfully so.

Not only the suspense-filled plots and the course-changing twists – but the immense knowledge the books impart about ancient signs and symbols, medieval art and architecture and all their hidden secrets, and a paradoxical interplay between scientific and historical accounts are idiosyncratic to the Dan Brown popular novels in their own way. Brown has carved a niche of his own in the tales of this kind.

 

THE DA VINCI CODE

The 2003 novel follows the events after an elderly curator of the famous Louvre museum is murdered, and his body is left with a Da Vinci related cipher leading to the world’s biggest secret protected by the secret society Priory of Sion – the bloodline of Jesus Christ. Langdon and talented French cryptologist Sophie Neveu go in search of the mystery and engage themselves in a breathtaking quest through the streets of Paris deciphering codes and symbols left in various Da Vinci creations; fighting false allegations, faceless killers and the risk of the truth being lost – all at the same time.

Read it For:
The book, like all other Brown novels, connects scientific knowledge and religious symbology magnificently. With mystical revelations, treasure-hunt like riddles and a challenge to the world’s most believed idea – it made an unputdownable read.
Don't Read it For:
The book sparked controversies for challenging the base of Christianity, and if one is a staunch believer of the faith, he or she might want to stay away from the book.
What makes this book stand out?:
It is one of the best books of its kind and full of trivia and information you never knew existed. One does not take more than one read to grasp the amount of research and imagination that went into the book to merge the real and fictional world in the way he has done it.

ANGELS AND DEMONS

After Italian physicist, Leonardo Vetra is murdered in the Swiss research facility CERN and is branded with the ambigram of a secret, long-vanished underground brotherhood – Illuminati,  Langdon is called over and recruited, not only to solve the mystery but to save the four missing cardinals on the eve of Conclave at the Vatican, as well as the entire Vatican City from evaporating into nothing by a substance called Anti-matter. Langdon and Vetra’s adopted daughter, Vittoria, chase the hired killer of the organization who is determined to kill the four preferati following a thematic pattern of the four elements – earth, air, fire, and water.

Read it For:
Its sheer suspense and edge-of-the-seat plot development that happen throughout the book, only to shock the reader in the end.
Don't Read it For:
Dan Brown is one faith-challenging man, and his books tend to hurt the orthodox beliefs of Christianity at its roots. Skip his book if your faith is too precious to you.
What makes this book stand out?:
The dire urgency of the chase which takes a break-neck speed in this one; because of not just an ancient secret, but actual lives of people in danger this time, makes it the best Dan Brown book and more enthralling read than its more famous successor.

INFERNO

Waking up in an unknown hospital bed in Florence with no memory of the last one day, Langdon is once again out on a crazy chase to stop a deadly airborne virus from getting spread. The virus, set up by the frenzied and dead antagonist Bertrand Zobrist, promises to bring a permanent solution to the ever-increasing problem of over-population and Langdon must follow a trail of hidden references of Dante’s magnum opus Inferno to find the virus and stop it from leaking. Langdon fears that he will run out of time and betray the trust of those who trust him blindly.

Read it For:
The legacy of Dan Brown, if nothing else. The novel magnificently maintains the suspense throughout the narrative, and successfully lands the trademark violent twist in the end.
Don't Read it For:
None of the Brown books call for a not-read status, but you might want to stay away if apocalyptic concepts or professor-turned-savior is not your genre of reading.
What makes this book stand out?:
The higher stakes, as the entire world was facing possible annihilation in the hands of a dead genius who sacrificed his life to save the world the way he deemed fit.

THE DIGITAL FORTRESS

Stunning and smart mathematician and code-breaker, Susan Fletcher, is called to her workplace by the NSA by Commander Trevor Strathmore on the morning of a holiday for an emergency. The eavesdropper organization of USA is being held hostage by a dead Japanese genius, or rather his brainchild – an unbreakable code that not even the omnipotent device TRANSLTR can break. Faced with a threat on the most sensitive US intelligence data getting vulnerable to an end user with the internet, once again the characters of the story are fighting a phantom as the former evicted employer of NSA seeks to avenge himself and reveal NSA for what it is, even after death.

Read it For:
A spine-chilling technical cobweb of tricks, lies, and conspiracies rooted in the clash of conscience makes the book a must-read of this genre.
Don't Read it For:
You’ll enjoy this unless you are a strict flag-waver of American Federal organizations and cannot take their frailty even in fiction.
What makes this book stand out?:
Its mixture of technical brilliance and real-life suspense. An underrated one for many, his first novel is one of Brown’s best-spun narratives ever.
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THE DECEPTION POINT

This full-blown political-technical thriller has a team of experts, along with data analyzer of the current White House workforce Rachel Sexton to investigate on the authenticity of a meteorite in the Arctic which seems to have evidence of extra-terrestrial life. On the eve of the Presidential election, this seems to be a win for the running government when suddenly there is a doubt about the authenticity of the discovery.

Read it For:
The different flavor of writing it offers and shows how a time-altering lie can be made up entirely based on the nuances of science.
Don't Read it For:
Many argue that the final climax and solution of the book is a bit cinematic and crosses the boundary of reality; also it lacks some of the heart-pulsing suspense that is the lifeline of other Brown novels.
What makes this book stand out?:
Its absolute plausibility. The book is not rooted in a century-old secret or a virus that does not exist but tells a story which is more shocking in its realism rather than surrealism.

THE LOST SYMBOL

Langdon stays well within his country this time around, as he is fooled into being invited to a lecture in the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington D.C. and is met with a shocking and unexpected invitation to follow an ancient path of esoteric wisdom. To save his mentor and father figure Peter Solomon, he must accept it and unravel mysterious Masonic secrets all across the American capital.

Read it For:
This time it is personal for Langdon and you need to find out what the ever composed man does when someone he actually cares for is harmed. The book also has one of the best sequence of the series when the antagonist attacks the female lead in a dark room with the sole motive to murder her.
Don't Read it For:
It has been criticised for having way too much detailed information which takes away the heart-pounding thrill to some extent.
What makes this book stand out?:
The book deals with a part of history untouched by Brown before. Different from European and Renaissance history, it delves into the history of the Fathers who created the great nation.

ORIGIN

Brown takes his favourite character to Spain this time to unravel the biggest question of the cosmic universe – who are we and why are we here and where do we go? Once again trailing along secret symbols and ancient art and architecture, Langdon discovers the truth that will change the world and its truth as we know it.

Read it For:
This is Brown’s fifth novel in the Langdon series and it promises all the power-packed stuff that a Robert Langdon novel has.
Don't Read it For:
The only reason you might not want to read it is because it is brand new and you better wait for a good review before you start with it.
What makes this book stand out?:
The plot it promises and the never-before-explored location of Spain.

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