Popular African American Romance Books

 

Romance, a locution of some ordinary alphabets assorted together to create the most extraordinary feeling an individual can experience in his/her lifetime. Basically, it’s a feeling of excitement and mystery associated with love. Even if you read out the writings of the ancient novelists or any other person writing contents on romance, he/she must have written it with the same purity, warmth, and peace. They say romance is a genre of fiction dealing with love in a sentimental or idealized way.

Now, considering the Romance contents produced by the novelists of the African American countries, they have some instincts and spark which is difficult to experience in the fictions of the producers of similar genre. The impact of their simplest form of expressing love is unmatchable. Some of the best American African romance books according to the reviews of the readers are listed below which is highly recommended for the book lovers.

 

Thorn’s Challenge

Atlanta's Westmoreland men were notoriously easy on the eyes, but champion motorcycle racer Thorn Westmoreland exuded a heat that could melt metal. Rugged and moody, he was a loner betrayed by love, a man committed to staying in control--until he met Dr. Tara Matthews.

Read it For:
every day that the sexiest man on earth appeared at her door, looking like God's gift in a black leather jacket. And Tara's chances of playing it cool with a man as hot as Thorn were about as good as a snowball's in hell. But when Tara reversed roles in their game of seduction, what were the odds of Thorn--the ultimate bad boy--coming out on top?
Don't Read it For:
every day that the sexiest man on earth appeared at her door, looking like God's gift in a black leather jacket. And Tara's chances of playing it cool with a man as hot as Thorn were about as good as a snowball's in hell. But when Tara reversed roles in their game of seduction, what were the odds of Thorn--the ultimate bad boy--coming out on top?
What makes this book stand out?:
The story is a little slow in the initials . But as you continue reading and knowing the characters validity and if you can get through the first few pages, you’ll love the book.

Forbidden

Rhine Fontaine is building the successful life he's always dreamed of—one that depends upon him passing for White. But for the first time in years, he wishes he could step out from behind the façade. The reason: Eddy Carmichael, the young woman he rescued in the desert. Outspoken, defiant, and beautiful, Eddy tempts the Rhine in ways that could cost him everything and the price seems worth paying. Eddy owes her life to the Rhine, but she won't risk her heart for him. As soon as she's saved enough money from her cooking, she'll leave this Nevada town and move to California. No matter how handsome he is, no matter how fiery the heat between them, Rhine will never be hers. Giving in for just one night might quench this longing. Or it might ignite an affair as reckless and irresistible as it is forbidden.

Read it For:
With her latest book Forbidden, Beverly Jenkins has written another masterpiece of African American romantic historical fiction. Set in the 1870s, Ms. Jenkins provides readers with a complex, enigmatic hero named Rhine Fontaine (who was introduced in an earlier Jenkins book, Through the Storm), and a brave, flexible, resolute heroine named Eddy Carmichael. Their paths cross under harrowing circumstances, and the story explores the complexities of an unlawful interracial attraction and subsequent love, along with the larger problem created by the secret Rhine has harbored since leaving Georgia during the Civil War. Add to that the fact that the Rhine is already engaged, and you have a story that is ripe with plots, subplots, and action. The main and supporting characters are extremely well-developed, and the story is enhanced by the historical places and events that are seamlessly woven into the story. Ms. Jenkins describes the various settings so vividly that clear mental images form as you read. This is truly a masterpiece of writing. Forbidden is the first in a new series by Beverly Jenkins about the West after slavery, and I highly recommend this riveting, inspirational work.
Don't Read it For:
Its a nice story but lack the depth of the love between the characters.
What makes this book stand out?:
Ms. Jenkins describes the various settings so vividly that clear mental images form as you read. This is truly a masterpiece of writing. Forbidden is the first in a new series by Beverly Jenkins about the West after slavery, and I highly recommend this riveting, inspirational work.

Homegoing

Effie and Esi: two sisters with two very different destinies. One sold into slavery; one a slave trader's wife. The consequences of their fate reverberate through the generations that follow. Taking us from the Gold Coast of Africa to the cotton-picking plantations of Mississippi; from the missionary schools of Ghana to the dive bars of Harlem, spanning three continents and seven generations, Yaa Gyasi has written a miraculous novel - the intimate, gripping story of a brilliantly vivid cast of characters and through their lives the very story of America itself. Epic in its canvas and intimate in its portraits, Homegoing is a searing and profound debut from a masterly new writer.

Read it For:
The stories of the generations are stunning in their detail and emotions. Wonderful read and education.
Don't Read it For:
A good book but I thought Roots, although from a different outlook, covered the dire situation of slaves and slavery better than Homegoing did. We read this book in one of my book clubs, and some found it difficult to follow and didn't really enjoy it. As is normal in book clubs, we have some serious readers who can handle a book such as Homegoing and others who don't want to read anything that takes a great deal of thought.
What makes this book stand out?:
A good book but I thought Roots, although from a different outlook, covered the dire situation of slaves and slavery better than Homegoing did. We read this book in one of my book clubs, and some found it difficult to follow and didn't really enjoy it. As is normal in book clubs, we have some serious readers who can handle a book such as Homegoing and others who don't want to read anything that takes a great deal of thought.

Destiny’s Embrace

With Destiny’s Embrace, Jenkins brings readers back to the American West, where Logan Yates, a self-important ranch owner, must confront his feelings for his beautiful, free-spirited housekeeper, Mariah Cooper. While they bicker incessantly, their sexual tension is palpable, and only rises when Mariah's former lover arrives on the scene. Will she accept Logan's heart? Set in 19th-century California, Destiny's Embrace features unforgettable characters and a satisfying mix of adventure and passion from nation's premier writer of African-American historical romance.

Read it For:
Destiny's Embrace kicks off a new historical series by Beverly Jenkins and it was one hilarious and exciting read. In Destiny's Embrace we have introduced to the Yates family and in particular, Logan Yates who is looking for a housekeeper. In steps Mariah Cooper a woman trying to forget her past and make new future. When these two meet, it is fireworks from the first words. As the synopsis states, they are constantly bickering, and each knows which buttons to push which leads some hilarious scene will keep readers laughing throughout the book. Ms. Jenkins does a wonderful job providing background information and historical details of California and how African Americans were successful. She also set the stage for the next installment that will have readers wondering who will be the next Yates sibling to fall under cupid's spell. The character development was good in that readers will fall in love with Mariah and at times want to smack Logan. Readers will want to pick up Destiny's Embrace; it was an enjoyable and entertaining love story.
Don't Read it For:
This author’s work over the years has been outstanding. I hoped for the same creative approach and historical reference as in her previous novels. This book is well below her usual standards. Very disappointing.
What makes this book stand out?:
A fantastic love story which will make your heart sing! The characters are well developed and the reader can envision them and their reactions
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Tempt Me at Midnight

Tempt Me at Twilight is the third book in The Hathaway’s Series. The series features the lives and trials of the Hathaway family. Each book can be read as a stand-alone. Set in 1852 in London, Tempt Me at Twilight is the love story of Poppy Hathaway and the mysterious Harry Rutledge.

Read it For:
This book is an exuberant work of sheer genius in the art of words. Woolf boldly experimented and created her own way of merging prose and poetry. This is by far one of her best works, which take you to a different world.
Don't Read it For:
Fans of traditional writing style might find it a little disappointing.
What makes this book stand out?:
the ethnicity of the characters in the novel.

Quade’s Babies

Quade Westmoreland's one-night love affair with Cheyenne had branded his body and soul, but he'd never even learned her last name. Almost a year later, driven by memories and one incriminating photo, the sexy operative had finally tracked her down—and discovered three little babies bearing his features. Learning he was a father made Quade even more determined: he would claim Cheyenne Steele in every way. Shockingly, the irresistible beauty seemed intent on resisting him. But the Westmoreland destiny was at stake, and Quade would fight for what was his.

Read it For:
Brenda has done again with another great story involving the Westmoreland's and the Steele's. Quade's babies is a great story from the beginning to the end. Bringing two headstrong people together is what makes this story so interesting. Quade was determined to have Cheyenne Steele and their triplets as much as Cheyenne was determined not to marry anyone without love. Loved it and the fact that Brenda included the Steele family from her previous books. I love continuing storylines, and Brenda writes one of the best by bringing in previous characters to her series.
Don't Read it For:
The novel has many twists and turns, and the fact that it is a play within a play makes it hard to follow.
What makes this book stand out?:
Woolf had an impressive command over the language and storytelling, the book is could only be written by her!

A little dare

When Shelly Brockman walked into his office, Sheriff Dare Westmoreland could almost taste the sweet, steamy passion they'd once shared. Then Shelly informed him he was the father of her son, the unruly preteen he'd arrested that day, and his fantasies turned to fury! Shelly had returned to her hometown in Georgia to save her son from the mean streets of Los Angeles. Getting to know his father would be good for her son. But would be so close to Dare–the only man to make her pulse race–reopen a wounded heart that had never healed? Or, would this be her final chance to win Dare's love?

Read it For:
Vibrant with life and loss, a truly great read.
Don't Read it For:
The story seems to drag on, and the readers may find it hard to connect with the characters.
What makes this book stand out?:
A fairly predictable, yet unusually satisfying tale. A few choice moments of hotness as well. Well worth the price, this book is one of the best reads among the best American African romance books.

Salvage the Bones

Jesmyn Ward, two-time National Book Award winner and author of Sing, Unburied, Sing, delivers a gritty but tender novel about family and poverty in the days leading up to Hurricane Katrina. A hurricane is building over the Gulf of Mexico, threatening the coastal town of Bois Sauvage, Mississippi, and Esch's father is growing concerned. A hard drinker, largely absent, he doesn't show concern for much else. Esch and her three brothers are stocking food, but there isn't much to save. Esch can't keep down what food she gets; she's fourteen and pregnant. As the twelve days that make up the novel's framework yield to their dramatic conclusion, this unforgettable family-motherless child sacrificing for one another as they can, protecting and nurturing where love is scarce-pulls itself up to face another day.

Read it For:
Woolf works brilliantly with three different stories and creates an impressionistic manner of writing.
Don't Read it For:
The book is not so interesting in the beginning.
What makes this book stand out?:
Woolf created a mark with her iconic writing style with this collection.

She’s My Baby

When someone leaves a baby on her doorstep on Christmas, magazine CEO Leila Owens, who is maternally challenged, finds herself juggling bottles, naps, and meetings, while falling in love with her gorgeous new neighbor, Garrick Grayson

Read it For:
The impressive storytelling skills and the gripping story of a man’s life, which changes with the Mediterranean war.
Don't Read it For:
The book uses a male protagonist but is still a classic Woolf story. You may be disappointed if you were looking for something new.
What makes this book stand out?:
Woolf was one of the most well-known writers. And this was only because she kept experimenting with new styles and ways.

The Help

Comparisons between the book and the movie may be unfair. The book contains so much information that it would be impossible to include all of it in two hours. That said, while I liked the movie, the book was far more enjoyable. The author made clever use of the three narrators. At first, I thought I might be put off by that choice, but once you adjust to the different voices, the rhythm adds an element to the book that a single point- of-view wouldn't have provided. The three principal characters speak for themselves.

Read it For:
It is an amazing book to read. The issues spelled out here are worth reading and understanding.
Don't Read it For:
the plot of the scenes is difficult to understand.
What makes this book stand out?:
it makes a good story and is one of the best reads on the list of American African romance books.

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