Top 10 Books on Manuscripts

 

Any handwritten document is called manuscripts. A handwritten book by a copyist on parchment or paper. Manuscripts were used especially in the Middle Ages before the invention of the print, and each manuscript is unique because there are no duplicates for it. Even if the text of two books is the same, as in the case of a model and its copy, the two books may be different by script, physical appearance, and even text, because a manuscript copy always contains some changes to its origin.

 

The Tales of Beedle the Bard

The Tales of Beedle the Bard, a magical classic, caught the attention of the reads of the book known as Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. Now, thanks to Hermione Granger's new translation of the ancient runes, we present this impressive edition with an introduction, notes and illustrations by J.K. Rowling and ample comments by Albus Dumbledore. Never before have the Muggles been informed of these richly imaginative stories: "The Wizard of the Leaping Plate", "The Fountain of the Good Luck", "The Hairy Heart of the Wizard", "The Little Girl's Bunny and Her Roast Stuff "and, of course," The story of the three brothers ". But not only are they the same as the fairy tales we now know and love, but their reading also offers us a new vision of the world of Harry Potter

Read it For:
The stories were a mixture of wonder and darkness, of hope and love, and the extra notes of Dumbledore and Jo were the perfect addition to this wonderful little book.
Don't Read it For:
This book takes us to a different world which was far away from the present world.
What makes this book stand out?:
Produced in 2007 by Harry Potter Artist J. K. Rowling, this manuscript of 157 pages of related fairy tales was created one of the seven. Six were given to the writer's closest friends, and the seventh was sold to the Amazon online retailer for charity for $ 3.98 million.

Black Hours

This Book of Hours, called Black Hours, is one of a handful of manuscripts written and illuminated on parchment stained or painted black. The result is quite interesting. The text in the book is written in silver and gold, with golden initials and endings of lines composed of animated chartreuse panels with yellow filigree. Gold leaves on a monochromatic blue background form the edges. The thumbnails are executed in a narrow palette of blue tones, antique roses and light tones, with extensions of green, grey and white. The solid black background is used to great advantage, especially thanks to the gold highlighting. The anonymous painter of Black Hours is an artist whose style depends mainly on Willem Vrelant, one of the dominant illuminators who worked in Bruges from the end of 1450 until his death in 1481. As in the work of Vrelant, the moving figures of angular shades a bit stiff in indefinite spaces. The flat faces of men are dominated by large noses.

Read it For:
This little book was very informative regarding the time period and the construction of the manuscript. The conservation problem has also been captured.
Don't Read it For:
This book covers violent phrases
What makes this book stand out?:
Although, in general, it is well preserved, this manuscript presents some condition problems. The black of his parchment, just as it makes the code so surprising, is also the cause of some serious imbalances. The carbon used in black makes the parchment surface smooth and shiny, a nice but not ideal support surface for some of the pigments. The Black Hours of Morgan await conservation treatments. Meanwhile, we are pleased to offer a virtual face-simile.

The Poor Man and the Lady

This first novel by Thomas Hardy spoke of the new and uninterrupted relationship between a son of peasants and the daughter of a local squire in Dorsetshire, England. This is made clear in the only summary of the existing book: a conversation transcribed between Hardy and the English poet Edmund Gosse in April 1915. But Hardy, who had written the story almost 50 years before, could not remember many details, even if less Two characters end up together. What we know from the transcript is that in the late 1860s, Hardy considered the work to be the most original he had written, and, by then, he had written many of the poems he was going to publish decades later. But the editors have rejected his manuscript. Some scholars believe that Hardy has incorporated pieces in his later works, including the poem "A poor man and a woman", the novel An indiscretion in the life of an heiress and his first published novel, Desperate Remedies.

Read it For:
It includes the tale of peasant which makes it more interesting.
Don't Read it For:
This book was never published but is available from many sources
What makes this book stand out?:
The Poor Man and the Lady was the first novel written by Thomas Hardy. It was written in 1867 and was never published. After the manuscript was rejected by at least five editors, Hardy gave up his attempts to sell the novel in its original form; however, he incorporated some of his scenes and themes in later works, particularly in the poem "The poor man and woman" and in the novel An indiscretion in the life of an heiress (1878).The manuscript no longer exists; Hardy destroyed the last surviving fragment during his last years, after abandoning the idea of reconstructing the rest of the novel by heart.

Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts: Twelve Journeys into the Medieval

This is a book on why medieval manuscripts are important. Meeting face to face with an important illuminated manuscript in the original is like meeting a very famous person. We can all pretend that a famous celebrity is not different from anyone, yet there is an undeniable emotion in knowing and talking to a person of global stature.

Read it For:
This book is a marvellous art exhibition, a fascinating series of mysterious stories, a journey through a period of European history and a reference volume for readers, even casually interested in medieval manuscripts.
Don't Read it For:
Some passages are worthwhile, but the author is presented as a kind and learned guide to these wonderful manuscripts.
What makes this book stand out?:
An extraordinary exploration of the medieval world: the most captivating history book of the year.
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The Voynich Manuscript: The Mysterious Code That Has Defied Interpretation for Centuries

Since its discovery in 1912, this medieval manuscript has baffled scholars and cryptanalysts with its unidentifiable script and bizarre illustrations. The authors examine the many existing theories about its possible authors and the information they may contain.

Read it For:
Fantastic, informative, interesting, well written. Lots of information arranged roughly in chronological order with beautiful sample illustrations.
Don't Read it For:
Some pages are missing, with about 240 remaining. The text is written from left to right and most pages have illustrations or diagrams. Some pages are folding sheets.
What makes this book stand out?:
Since his discovery of Wilfrid Voynich in an Italian monastery in 1912, the Voynich manuscript has baffled scholars and cryptanalysts with his unidentifiable script and his strange illustrations. Written in an unknown language or still indecipherable code, this medieval manuscript contains hundreds of illustrations of unknown plants, cosmological maps and unexplained scenes of naked nymphs immersed in a green liquid that some interpret as a symbolic representation of human reproduction and union. soul with the body

The Curse of the Voynich

With his cryptic writing and curious drawings of naked women, the strange manuscript Voynich has fascinated and frustrated for centuries all those who found it. But now, returning to the dangerous journey of a man to the east from Renaissance Europe to the Ottoman Empire, "The Curse of the Voynich" opens the door to the lost world that gave life to this mystery

Read it For:
It is a very interesting, useful and intriguing book for everyone, not just for academics or ornithologists.
Don't Read it For:
This book includes the drawing of naked women. It is not suitable for children.

PopCo

PopCo tells the story of Alice Butler, twenty-nine, a singular solitary, fiercely intelligent, with an affinity for secret codes and mathematics. He works for the huge toy company called PopCo, where he creates games of curiosity for children: KidSpy, KidTec and KidCracker. At the corporate conference, Alice and her colleagues participate in the development of the final product for teenagers.

Read it For:
PopCo is idealistic, easy condescending, naive and shamelessly political. He has a lot more ideas than what novels writing courses would say appropriately. But if you do not like it, you're missing out.
Don't Read it For:
It's an uncomfortable novel to read, and it's about uncomfortable things.
What makes this book stand out?:
The book suggests that at any time during your daily work routine, you might observe the magic and revolution of your collaborators who change your life and confirm it. It's enough to give you some hope in your nine-five.

Alice in Wonderland

The Adventures of Alice in Wonderland (commonly abbreviated as Alice in Wonderland) is an 1865 novel written by the English mathematician Charles Lutwidge Dodgson under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll. It's about a girl named Alice who falls into a rabbit hole in a fantasy world populated by particular anthropomorphic creatures

Read it For:
Carroll represented a unique and interesting world in the story.
Don't Read it For:
Events in the story were sometimes random and did not always connect.
What makes this book stand out?:
Story plays with logic, giving history lasting popularity with adults and children. This book is considered one of the best examples of the literary genre without meaning. His course and his narrative structure, his characters and his images have greatly influenced popular culture and literature, especially in the fantasy genre.

A History of Illuminated Manuscripts

Medieval manuscripts are among the greatest glories of Western civilization. With their gilded and painted decorations and charming miniatures, they have always had an immense charm, and their images can be seen everywhere, from greeting cards and gift wrapping paper to expensive faxes. This amusing and authoritative book is the first to provide a general introduction to the whole topic of book creation from the Middle Ages to the invention of printing and beyond. Christopher de Hamel vividly describes the widely varying circumstances in which manuscripts were created, from early Gospel monastic books to university textbooks, secular novels, books of hours, and classical texts to humanistic bibliophiles. As the story develops, the marvellous variety of manuscripts and their illumination is revealed, and many fundamental questions are asked: who wrote the books, what texts they contain, who read them, how they were made and what they were for them.

Read it For:
This is a very useful book for understanding the history, development and production of illuminated books
Don't Read it For:
This book might seem boring for the casual reader
What makes this book stand out?:
The illuminated manuscripts have always been much appreciated, and among these are some of the great works of art in the world. With its animated fiction and many new and excellent illustrations, this new edition of a highly praised book offers the perfect introduction to a wide and fascinating subject.

Introduction to Manuscript Studies

Providing a broad and accessible orientation to the field of medieval manuscripts, this widely illustrated book by Raymond Clemens and Timothy Graham is unique among the manuals of palaeography, codicology, and manuscript illumination for its scale and level of detail. It will be of great help for students of history, art history, literature and religious studies who meet medieval manuscripts for the first time, while also attracting advanced scholars and general readers interested in the history of the book before the era of the press.

Read it For:
Everything you need to know to start studying the manuscripts. It includes many beautiful illustrations / photographs.
Don't Read it For:
The quality of printing is not that good.
What makes this book stand out?:
Each chapter of this general guide presents numerous colour plates that exemplify every aspect described in the text and are mainly taken from the collections of the Chicago Newberry Library and the Parker Library of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge.

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