Top 10 Empathy Books

 

Empathy, as per definition, is the ability to feel what the other person is feeling. In other words, it means to be capable of putting yourself in other person’s shoes or put yourself in a reference. Empathy books are no different; they make the reader feel everything which is written in the book and allow the reader to understand more profound sentiments which lay dormant most of the times. Here is a list of the top ten books which invoke the feeling of empathy.

 

Wonder

Wonder is an excellent book from the write, R. J Palacio. This is regarded as one of the top-rated books on empathy; the story revolves around a child called August Pullman. Pullman was an ordinary kid, with ordinary habits, ordinary preferences but an un-ordinary face. August was born with a deformed face and therefore could not attend a regular school for kids. It is his first day at his new school where he is going to begin fresh classes for the fifth grade.

Read it For:
Palacio has done a remarkable job with this book. He has written something extraordinary. The book is written in a diary format, and the chapters are short and sweet. The content of the book is original and uplifting.
Don't Read it For:
Although the book is impressive in its own right, the book fails to change the world. It is merely a story with a brilliant idea.
What makes this book stand out?:
The idea in the book along with the content is highly original makes a good read for both adults and the young ones.

Each Kindness

Each Kindness is a book by Jacqueline Woodson. Chloe’s class has a new girl named Maya. Maya is very different from the others, she wears old clothes and plays with old-fashioned Now and then, Maya tries to join Chloe and her friends; they would ignore her. Maya tries to make friends with them but, with no luck, she eventually quits school. One day, Chloe’s teacher gives a lesson about kindness, which is when she realizes she had lost the opportunity to be friends with Maya.

Read it For:
There aren’t many books that can do the magic this book does.
Don't Read it For:
This book is quite sad. The ending is not a happy one.
What makes this book stand out?:
The book gives out an impressive message about kindness and lost opportunities.

Mockingbird

The book follows the story around Catlin’s world where everything is black or white. Things are good or bad for her, that is how her brother explained things. But then Catlin’s brother passed away, and her father had no idea what to do with Catlin. We later get to know that Catlin suffers from Asperger’s. While trying to find something, anything, Catlin stumbles upon the definition of “closure” and instantly decides that that’s what she needs. In her search for closure, Catlin realizes everything is not black and white.

Read it For:
The plot is exceptional, and the characters are well crafted.
Don't Read it For:
The narration in the book seems bland, and at times the Catlin becomes overly literal.
What makes this book stand out?:
The exceptionally well-written plot and inspiring message make for a good read.

Last Stop on Market Street

A beautiful book about a bus ride and the beauty of Each Sunday, CJ rides the bus with his grandma. Throughout the bus ride, CJ wonders why they always take the bus and don’t own a car as his friend Colby does. Among many other things, the prominent worries are that why is he without an iPod and why do the two of them always get down at the dirtiest stop. After CJ tells his grandma about his worries, his grandma shows her the fun and joy one could have, with what the two of them already had.

Read it For:
The book matches its texts with vivid illustrations of the same level, which only enhances the reading experience.
Don't Read it For:
Most reader, parents, and enthusiasts may have a problem with the broken grammar which encompasses the book.
What makes this book stand out?:
The book’s message about finding joy in whatever you have is an impressive one, and this book makes it seem utterly effortless.
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Those Shoes

A book about a little kid wanting something everyone has. At Jeremy’s school, everyone is sporting a cool kind of pair of shoes. Jeremy told his grandma that he wished to have those shoes. But strict and stern grandma reminded Jeremy that they only had room for needs and not wants. Poor Jeremy did not say a thing, but when his shoes fell off at school one day, he was more than determined to buy those shoes. So, along with Grandma Jeremy went to the thrift shop. But to his demise, the shoes were small! He knew sore feet were a real pain, but he wanted those shoes. Amidst his conflict, his eyes found a warm pair of shoes, and that is what he bought. Now Jeremy has warm pair boots, a loving grandma and the capability to help a friend.

Read it For:
An intoxicatingly sweet book, written with the most adorable message in mind.
Don't Read it For:
When Jeremy gives away the smaller shoes to someone else because they were small for him, it confuses the reader. The reader doesn’t understand what exactly the message here is.
What makes this book stand out?:
This story gave a powerful message about love, sharing, kindness, and friendship.

The Invisible Boy

Brian is an invisible boy. He is not seen by his classmates; even his teachers can’t see him, he doesn’t get invited to playgroups or to birthday parties. Brian tries, but he doesn’t succeed. But then, one day a new boy comes to the class. Brian is the only person who makes the new boy feel welcome. The new boy instantly becomes Brian’s friend. The two team up on a group project, where Brian is finally able to shine. Brian is no longer invisible.

Read it For:
A good story with great illustrations to inculcate the value of compassion and kindness.
Don't Read it For:
The book does not have anything out of the ordinary.
What makes this book stand out?:
The pretty illustrations with the right text beside it make it a wonderful and fun read.

El Deafo

El Deafo is about a girl who is about to start afresh at a new school. But the problem is that she has a gigantic hearing aid strapped to her chest. She is overwhelmed with nervousness because everyone at her new school won’t be deaf, unlike her older school. But at school she makes a terrific discovery, she could hear her teachers everywhere, in the classroom, in the hallways, anywhere and everywhere.

Read it For:
The book portrays growing up beautifully.
Don't Read it For:
The book has a lot of questionable content. Cece’s teachers and parents are smoking multiple times, and the book also shows underage kids smoking and her friends do not really seem like her friends.
What makes this book stand out?:
The autobiographical narration of the book makes it a fun read.

Ordinary Mary’s Extraordinary Deed

One day, ordinary Mary goes out for a walk and finds some regular blueberries. She picks some out and gives it to Mrs. Bishop. And there she starts a chain reaction which goes around the entire world. It started with Mrs. Bishop making blueberry muffins.

Read it For:
The book portrays growing up beautifully.
Don't Read it For:
The book has a lot of questionable content. Cece’s teachers and parents are smoking multiple times, and the book also shows underage kids smoking and her friends do not really seem like her friends.
What makes this book stand out?:
The autobiographical narration of the book makes it a fun read.

Fish in the Tree

This book follows Ally, who is a clever girl and has been able to hide the inability of not being able to read from many people. However, she doesn’t fit in; she knows that and yet she doesn’t wish to ask for help. Mr. Daniel’s, the new teacher, helps her out.

Read it For:
The brilliant message that everyone is different and everyone fits in their own way.
Don't Read it For:
The characters are stereotyped, and the teachers do not seem to care if the child was being bullied in front of them.
What makes this book stand out?:
The beautiful book shows that everyone is truly different.

Counting by the 7s

This book revolves around Willow Chance, a twelve-year-old genius. She begins to diagnose the entire world in problems of seven. But her life changes as her parents die in a crash, but she somehow manages to push through and find happiness again.

Read it For:
Ends with the best ending, you won’t find a happy ending for the child after their parents die. But this books allows the kid to be happy again.
Don't Read it For:
This book feels like it meant to be for adults than for kids.
What makes this book stand out?:
This book, unlike all the others on this list, is not about the tragedy but of endurance on the little child’s part.

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