Popular Books on Adoption

 

Adoption is a tough process to get done. Especially with a child coming into your house that you don’t know and have to raise from scratch. Adoption for the child is also tough because trusting new people is tough.

 

The Book Thief

Set during World War II in Germany, this novel is the story of Liesel Meminger, a foster girl living outside of Munich. Liesel scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can’t resist – books. Liesel Meminger, a lost and orphaned child, is brought to her foster parents, Hans and Rosa Huberman. Afte Liesel’s foster father discovers a stolen book with her; he teaches her how to read instead of reprimanding her. she discovers her newfound hunger for books after her foster father begins teaching her and she begins to get as many as books as possible to satisfy her curiosity for reading, and she realizes the importance of what mere words could mean to a man.

Read it For:
Impeccable storylines running parallel to each other,
Don't Read it For:
Nothing. This book makes you cry.
What makes this book stand out?:
Zusak compels us to not put down his book because of its unusual rendition by Death. With a masterful narration, he captures our minds and makes us empathize with the situation. Hugely imaginative, it has wonderful imagery and metaphors to describe the atmosphere that reigned in Hitler's time. This book is a must-read on the top 10 books on adoption list.

The Jungle Book

Mowgli was adopted by wolves and raised away from humans in the Indian jungle. This is an enduring story about animals being as loving and nurturing or more than their human counterparts.

Read it For:
the compelling narrative, the vivid character sketches and an easy to follow, yet intriguing storyline.
Don't Read it For:
If you don’t like to read about children’s adventures.
What makes this book stand out?:
the way in which the characters of the animals are written, which imbibes qualities in them of humaneness and empathy.

Oliver Twist

Oliver Twist is a young orphan who is adopted multiple times by all kinds of people. The story is about his struggles and how, finally he gets adopted by a good person, the gentle and genteel Mr. Brownlow. Also known as The Parish Boy’s Progress, each adoption enables Dickens to investigate the various plights of destitute children in Victorian England.

Read it For:
Compelling narrative and a masterful writing style that only Dickens can bring out.
Don't Read it For:
The sheer brilliance of this book will shock you and compel you to get your hands on all of Dickens.
What makes this book stand out?:
excellent writing and good character sketches.

The Cider House Rules

Homer Wells was a long-term resident of an orphanage and spent his days “being of use” to the director Dr. Larch.  Larch’s technique includes keeping a healthy distance from the orphans so they can be resettled into families, Homer has returned so many times that Larch’s boundaries eventually break down. The book shows how adoption can mean many things and Homer’s identity becomes bound up with his institution, so much so that he is known as “the boy who belonged to St Cloud.” Then a young man brings his beautiful fiance to Dr. Larch for an abortion, and everything about the couple beckons Homer to the wide world outside the orphanage.

Read it For:
The amazing storyline and impeccable writing.
Don't Read it For:
this book doesn’t fail to startle and shock you by taking you into the protagonist’s life.
What makes this book stand out?:
The superbly executed plot and the uniqueness of it. This book, one of the best books on adoption, will leave you with chills
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The Winter’s Tale

Perdita is abandoned in the wilderness after her royal father Leontes wrongly believes her to be illegitimate. Although the being raised as shepherds and by simple means, a prince still falls in love with Perdita. As in a fair few adoption tales, her royal nature has been retained despite the fact she is unaware of it.

Read it For:
The style and narration that is excellent in faith.
Don't Read it For:
If you aren’t a fan of Elizabethan English, this book probably isn’t for you.
What makes this book stand out?:
Shakespeare, duh!

The Bad Seed

Eight-year-old Rhoda Penmark is every parent’s dream, polite and impeccably behaved. However, fatal “accidents” occur around her. Her mother finds out that she herself was adopted, her birth mother a notorious serial killer; the bad seed that her daughter has inherited.

Read it For:
Throat grabbing story, and a chilling ending.
Don't Read it For:
If you are scared easily.
What makes this book stand out?:
The spine-tingling tale of little Rhoda Penmark had a tremendous impact on the thriller genre and generated a whole perdurable crop of creepy kids. Today, The Bad Seed remains a masterpiece of suspense that's as chilling, intelligent, and timely as ever before.

Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?

Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal? is a memoir about the author’s struggle to find happiness and the terrible force of her adopted mother’s apocalyptic religious fervor.

Read it For:
Witty, acute, fierce, and celebratory.
Don't Read it For:
There is no reason for anyone not to read this book.
What makes this book stand out?:
a tough-minded search for belonging, for love, identity, home, and a mother.

The Secret Garden

The protagonist, the sickly, spoilt 10-year-old Mary Lennox, bereft of her parents and household and moving from India to a chilly Yorkshire, undergoes a profound emotional and spiritual journey with her adoptive family.

Read it For:
considered a classic in literature.
Don't Read it For:
If you don’t like crisp language.
What makes this book stand out?:
The innocence of childhood pertaining to wonderful discoveries and friendships.

Red Dust Road

The book is about Kay’s search for her real parents, which begins with her as a child in Glasgow, realizing that her skin is a different color to her mum and dad’s.

Read it For:
A compassionate and funny account of Nature and nurture.
Don't Read it For:
if you aren’t fond of coming of age and finding oneself stories.
What makes this book stand out?:
a picture of warmth, humor, and compassion. This is a must read on the list of 10 best-selling books on adoption.

Jane Eyre

When Mrs. Reed unwillingly adopts Jane, the young girl begins a fight to define herself in the face of others attempting to do it for her.

Read it For:
The impeccable language and the character of Jane Eyre.
Don't Read it For:
if you don’t like classic literature.
What makes this book stand out?:
This is the ultimate novel, for so many people, about how one holds onto identity in the face of overwhelming odds.

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