Top 10 Books about Kites

 

Kites have been a part of human civilization for centuries. They have a long and varied history almost as unique as human civilization itself. Traditionally, they were made in a similar fashion with threads, cloth, wax, and gum, evolving over centuries.

Today, although they are only used in the form of festivity and celebratory props, and can be seen in all sizes, the technology and science behind them have been the same. The making and flying of kites have been documented in extraordinary detail over time. Kites have seen their way into popular culture through art, music, dance as well as literature in philosophical, metaphorical and sometimes literal forms. The art has spun some popular books on kites.

 

The Penguin Book Of Kites

This book is a complete guide to the making and flying of kites right down to the science

Read it For:
Kite-making enthusiasts who are new to the craft will enjoy this as a beginner course.
Don't Read it For:
It's a how-to book so readers who are looking for a plot may be disappointed.
What makes this book stand out?:
The book has documented the making and handling of kites in excellent detail.

The Magnificent Book Of Kites: Explorations in Design, Construction, Enjoyment & Flight

This book delves into the design, science, and construction of kites with an engineer’s eye and a designer’s point of view. Going on to explain the flight mechanisms of each specific design to the last detail.

Read it For:
This book is a treat for people who are in the kite making a community for a while and want to learn a little more and get a bit better at the art of making kites.
Don't Read it For:
It may not be for amateur enthusiasts who want to get started with kite-making. This book has a moderate to high level of difficulty on the craft.
What makes this book stand out?:
The precision that has gone into writing this book is surprising. A must read for kite-making professionals if they want to branch out and make kites of different types and sizes.

The Kite Runner

The Kite Runner is author Khaled Hosseini's debut book as a prose writer, and he does a great job at telling the story of two friends who grow up playing kites in Kabul. Amir and Hassan grow up and separate, but Amir stays haunted by a childhood incident where he betrayed Hassan’s trust. Amir returns to his homeland to learn the story of Hassan’s son after he learns that he and his wife were murdered by the Taliban.

Read it For:
The quality storyline that Khaled weaves throughout the book captures the reader’s attention from the first page right to the last.
Don't Read it For:
Contains a description of rape, gun violence, and similar incidents, may not be suitable for young readers.
What makes this book stand out?:
Khaled Hosseini has a way with words, and he captures the experiences and emotions of Amir perfectly.

Henry and the Kite Dragon

This book is a feel-good tale of two rival groups of children from different ethnicities in 1920s New York, kites and Chinese culture serve as the backdrop for the flow of this story.

Read it For:
It's a great read for children and adults alike.
Don't Read it For:
It's a children’s story with illustrations. Serious readers may not enjoy it.
What makes this book stand out?:
The illustrations in the book are aesthetic and supplement the narration of the story beautifully.
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Kite Day: A Bear and Mole Story

Another feel-good children’s story about a bear and a mole who decide to fly a kite when rain breaks in and their kite flies away and gets stuck in the tree. On reaching the kite, they end up protecting a nest with baby birds from the rain.

Read it For:
The feel-good factor in the story is heartwarming.
Don't Read it For:
It is a children’s book with illustrations. Serious readers may not like it.
What makes this book stand out?:
The illustrations in the book supplement the flow of the story and are visually pleasing.

The Kite Making Handbook

Published in 2004, this book is another one in the list of book about kites with the exception that this one keeps thing short and to the point.

Read it For:
This book is for the new kite maker who wants to get up to speed as soon as possible.
Don't Read it For:
Readers not interested in kite making may not like it.
What makes this book stand out?:
The author does a great job of not straying from the point of the book while still filling it with ample information to get you started into kite-making.

Setting Free the Kites

This is the story of two boys, Robert and Nathan. Everything changes when Robert meets Nathan in eighth grade, who is confident, fearless, impetuous and fascinated with flying kites! They go through tough times and family drama together. Setting Free The Kites is a poignant story of pain, joy and the glories of young friendship.

Read it For:
Vibrant with the emotions that come with a great friendship, a genuinely good read.
Don't Read it For:
Too much going on, too busy of a story, readers may find it hard to connect to the characters due to their young age.
What makes this book stand out?:
The story is expansive and teaches us a lot about life, joy, loss, and friendship.

Kites: The Art of Using Natural Material

In this book, the author John Browning shows the reader how he makes kites from naturally available materials and makes them fly. A fine blend of nature and science in an age where people have forgotten that things can be enjoyed without the need for factory-made materials.

Read it For:
The uniqueness the book offers as opposed to all the other kite-making books so far.
Don't Read it For:
Readers who are not kite making enthusiasts may find the book boring to read.
What makes this book stand out?:
Its description of the use of natural materials and the science behind it.

Wings of Resistance: The Giant Kites of Guatemala

The Wings of Resistance follows the Guatemalan tradition of flying kites. Originally, this festival started as a way of remembering the dead, today the kite festival has become a way for the indigenous community of Guatemala to heal from the trauma of war.

Read it For:
The book documents the history of Guatemala, how the war changed its landscape and how the kite festival in Guatemala compares to the festivals celebrated over the world.
Don't Read it For:
This book is written in a documentary style which may not go well with some readers.
What makes this book stand out?:
The distinct portrayal of the kites and what the different sizes and designs of the kites stand for, in the eyes of the Guatemalan people.

The Complete Beginner’s Guide to Making and Flying Kites

Like the title says, this book is the complete beginner’s guide to making and flying kites. Published in 1977, this is the oldest book on the list.

Read it For:
This book is for complete beginners into kite-making and flying who don’t mind taking the slow approach.
Don't Read it For:
Readers who are not familiar with kite-making or uninterested may not enjoy the book.
What makes this book stand out?:
This book manages to cover every point that goes into the making of kites.

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