Top 10 Books on Angola

 

Angola is a southern African country, whose varied terrain includes tropical Atlantic beaches, a labyrinthine river system and the sub-Saharan desert that extends beyond the Namibia border. The colonial history of the village is reflected in its influential Portuguese cuisine and in its landmarks such as Fortaleza de São Miguel, a fortress built by the Portuguese in 1576 to defend the capital, Luanda.

A General Theory of Oblivion

A General Theory of Oblivion is a wild mosaic of a novel that tells the story of Angola through Ludo, a woman who settles in her apartment on the eve of Angola's independence. For the next 30 years, he lives on vegetables and pigeons and burns his furniture to keep himself warm. But the outside world is filtered, through fragments on the radio, voices from next door, glimpses of a man fleeing from his pursuers and a note attached to the feet of a bird. Until one day he meets Sabalu, a young man on the street that climbs on his terrace.

Read it For:
With the brand, humour and warmth characteristic of the author, A General Theory of Oblivion is a captivating novel about human drama and the emotions, hopes and dangers of radical change.
Don't Read it For:
Everything in this book is hindered by a serious lack of development. It seemed more like a skeleton of a story at an early stage of writing a finished book
What makes this book stand out?:
A General Theory of Oblivion is a mosaic of perfectly elaborate and wild novels, which plays with love for storytelling and fable.

Good Morning Comrades

Luanda, Angola, 1990. Ndalu is a normal twelve-year-old at an extraordinary time and place. Like his friends, he likes to laugh at his teachers, avoid homework and tell extravagant stories. But Ndalu's teachers are Cubans; his duties include writing essays on the role of the workers and peasants and the stories that he and his friends tell of a criminal gang called Empty Crate specializing in attack schools. Ndalu is perplexed by the father of the family, comrade Antonio, who thinks that Angola worked better when it was a Portuguese colony, and from his aunt Dada, who lives in Portugal and does not know what a ration card is. With a fascinating and absolutely original voice, Good Morning Comrades tells the story of a group of friends who create a perfect childhood in a revolutionary socialist country fighting in a bitter war. However, the world is changing around these children, and like all of childhood, Ndalu cannot last.

Read it For:
The rhythm and the jumps make reading almost annoyingly fast, and it seems material that could have expanded effectively, but even so, it is a warm, rich and useful reading.
Don't Read it For:
Story seems interesting only for those who are interested in this subject.
What makes this book stand out?:
An internationally renowned novel, already published in half a dozen countries, Good Morning Comrades is an unforgettable fictional work of one of the most fascinating young African writers.

The Book of Chameleons

The narrator of this novel is a fascinating lizard. Living on the wall of Felix Ventura's living room, Felix, the lizard's friend and the hero of history, is a man who sells the past. If you do not like yours, you can find a new one, a new past. - full of better memories, with a complete lineage, photos and everything

Read it For:
The story has a different plot and different character.
Don't Read it For:
The only negative thing about the book is the English title. The lizard in question is a gecko, as I said, it is not a chameleon. There is no chameleon in the entire book (well, one, but only indirectly)
What makes this book stand out?:
This is a story that discreetly indicates a world literary tradition. The book of chameleons is a reflection on literary production; real events force us to think differently. At times it may seem metaphysical, but when faced with the memory of Angola's relatively recent bloody past and its consequences, we are reminded that Agualusa is doing much more than playing with us.

The Whistler

From Angola, a country plagued by civil wars and its consequences in the last 30 years, comes a surprising story of hope, passion and magical realism of an innovative young African novelist. A young man arrives in the church in a small African town and starts whistling so well that the priest is left to cry. While his stay of one week continues, the whistler is influenced by the picturesque inhabitants of the village, since all are bewitched and abandon themselves to the moods of their melodies.

Read it For:
Live, lyrical, fascinating, The Whistler has an undeniable charm.
Don't Read it For:
Author feels overexcited, and when Ondjaki is clearly pushing the Portuguese to the maximum, the English translation has to resort to a less convincing linguistic game.
What makes this book stand out?:
There seems to be considerable effort behind The Whistler, from a narrative that is reduced (quite effectively) to its essence to the titles of each of the very short chapters. The quotes come from writers that include Tchinguiz Aitmatov, Pepetela, Henri Michaux, Hölderlin, Clarice Lispector, Jorge Luis Borges and Cervantes, an inebriating mixture to load any book.
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Rainy Season

A journalist - the autobiographical characteristics are quite deliberate - is trying to find out what happened to Lydia, who died in Luanda in 1992, a period when the civil war broke out again with unprecedented ferocity after the rebel leader Jonas Savimbi and your UNITA movement. he refused to accept defeat in the first free and democratic elections in the country. The plot, an intricate tangle of facts and fiction, tells the disappointment of the two protagonists, which represents the disillusionment of an entire nation.

Read it For:
This book is very motivating and interesting
Don't Read it For:
This book represents the disillusionment of two protagonists.
What makes this book stand out?:
The story tells the disappointment of the two protagonists, which represents the disillusionment of an entire nation.

Nzingha: Warrior Queen of Matamba, Angola, Africa, 1595 (The Royal Diaries)

It presents the diary of Nzingha, thirteen years old, a 16th-century West African princess who loves to hunt and hopes to lead her reign one day against the invasion of Portuguese slave traders.

Read it For:
It presents the diary of Nzingha, thirteen years old, a 16th-century West African princess who loves to hunt and hopes to lead her reign one day against the invasion of Portuguese slave traders.
Don't Read it For:
Unfortunately, this was too short for a novel. The content worked for around 80 pages, which was disappointing.
What makes this book stand out?:
Based on real historical facts, places, people and customs, this novel represents the fascinating details of the strength and courage of a remarkable young woman in defending her world against the subterfuges, spies and assault of the Portuguese. Patricia McKissack is the respected and award-winning author of more than 100 children's books and historical novels, including Newbery Honour’s book The Dark-Thirty: Southern Tales of the Supernatural and Colour Me Dark: Nellie Lee Love's Diary.

The Return of the Water Spirit

Set in Angola in the late 1980s, at a time of war, and when the ruling elite of Marxism were involved in corruption, nepotism and unbridled capitalism. Three centuries earlier, a horrific crime occurred, the beheading of a slave who had had inappropriate relations with his master's daughter. Now, in the same Plaza Kinaxixi, in the city of Luanda, the buildings fall one after the other disconcerting the engineers of the country. Many describe this mysterious process as "Luanda Syndrome, the punishment of God in a degenerate society. Using the essence of African mythology that had been almost erased from history, could this be explained by the return of an aquatic spirit.

Read it For:
It's nice and informative.
Don't Read it For:
This book has nothing different from the other Pepetela books.
What makes this book stand out?:
The novel focuses on the interaction between these two forces: the forces of the old and the new. Just as faith can move mountains, the spirit of water can move cities. This book is a fierce criticism of the ruling elite of Angola for abandoning its socialist principles in favour of unbridled capitalism.

Angola Beloved

A fascinating history of pioneering missions and the conflict of the Gospel with witchcraft in the African nation of Angola. Said with humour, warmth and intuition.

Read it For:
This autobiography is told with humour, warmth and understanding from the experience of forty years
Don't Read it For:
the author talked about bureaucracy he encountered only.
What makes this book stand out?:
AFRICA is the land of mystery, cruelty, fear, darkness, sounds and smells. At the heart of this fascinating continent lies the little-known but very present-day village of Angola. Reading the history, culture and customs of Angola, witchcraft and folklore, as well as the experience of T. Ernest Wilson who learns a new language, begins the indigenous churches, the gospel in the diamond mines, incredible journeys on foot, difficulties and joys, frustrations and fruits in the field of pioneering missions.

Band-Aid for a Broken Leg

Band-Aid for a Broken Leg is an inspiring story by Damien Brown, an Australian doctor who works in Doctors Without Borders (Doctors Without Borders).

Read it For:
The splendour of this book lies in the moving stories told. In many ways, this is not Brown's story; it's the story of all the patients who helped (and lost).
Don't Read it For:
The tone of this book is dry and uninteresting, which causes a psychological barrier to finish it.
What makes this book stand out?:
A powerful, surprisingly entertaining and finally inspiring account of life on the medical front, and a moving testimony to work done by Doctors Without Borders.

Blue Dahlia, Black Gold: A Journey Into Angola

Since the end of its paralyzing 27-year civil war more than a decade ago, Angola has changed almost beyond recognition. A petroleum-driven mine has caused massive foreign investment and fabulously rich new elite, so much so that its capital, Luanda, is the second most expensive city in the world. Today, fortunes have been made and lost overnight, and wealthy Angolans are buying the assets of their former colonizer, Portugal.

Read it For:
"A rich and fascinating book about an African power dominated by a rare talent travel writer". TIM BUTCHER, author of Blood River and Chasing the Devil.
Don't Read it For:
Reader might get bored after sometime while reading this book. This does not mean that this is not an informative reading; it is, much more. It also has a main light feeling and news that is essential as it is launched a lot.
What makes this book stand out?:
The book tells the reader everything about Angola, a country that had entered and left the news since 1975, when it began the beginning of its civil war of nearly 30 years, through its blood diamonds that were used for supporting the war and the huge amounts of oil and LNG. Angola is a country with great wealth and enormous poverty. This was a very interesting book

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