Top 10 Books on Australia

 

Australia is a country and a continent surrounded by the Indian and Pacific oceans. Its main cities, Sydney, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Adelaide, are coastal. Its capital, Canberra, is inland. The country is known for its Sydney Opera House, the Great Barrier Reef, a vast inland desert called Outback and unique animal species such as kangaroos and platypuses.

 

The Book Thief

In fact, it's a small story, among other things: a girl, some words, an accordionist, some German fans, a Jewish fighter and a group of thieves Set during World War II in Germany, Markus Zusak's revolutionary novel is the story of Liesel Meminger, an adopted child living outside Munich. Liesel makes a miserable existence by stealing when he finds something he cannot resist: books. With the help of his adoptive father playing the accordion, he learns to read and share his stolen books with his neighbours during the attacks, as well as with the Jew hiding in his basement before being taken to Dachau.

Read it For:
This is a book to keep, a new classic.
Don't Read it For:
If you want a quick reading, this book is not for you. If you like only the happy end, this book is not for you. If you do not like experimental fiction, this book is not for you.
What makes this book stand out?:
Book Browse Ruby 2007 prize winner. This is an unforgettable story about the ability of books to nourish the soul.

Possum Magic

Grandma Poss uses her best bush magic to make silence invisible. But when Hush wants to be able to see herself again, the two possums must cross Australia to find the magical food that will make Hush visible once again.

Read it For:
There is a nice pictorial map at the end showing the route (including regional foods) and places in Australia. This is a sweet story of an opossum, magically invisible for security reasons by her grandmother, who decides she wants to be visible.
Don't Read it For:
Many new words included with foreign animals, which hinder learning because there is nothing that tells us what the animal is, even if there are images.
What makes this book stand out?:
Another gift from Mem Fox that will surely be appreciated. The extravagant illustrations are a wonderful compliment.

The Secret River

In 1806, William Thornhill, an illiterate English boatman and a man of quick temper but deep compassion, steals a load of wood and, as part of his condescending condemnation, is deported, along with his beloved wife Sal in New South Wales. colony in what would become Australia. The Secret River is the story of William and Sal's deep love for his exotic little corner of the new world, and William's gradual awareness that if he wants to establish a home for his family, he must take the land by force of people that came before him.

Read it For:
The Secret River readers will learn about the lives of people in London during the 18th century.
Don't Read it For:
The novel has 334 pages, of which about 80% is taken with environmental minutiae.
What makes this book stand out?:
Acclaimed worldwide, The Secret River is a magnificent work of historical fiction that carries.

The Narrow Road to the Deep North

A novel about the cruelty of war, the fragility of life and the impossibility of love. The story of Richard Flanagan, of Dorrigo Evans, an Australian doctor tormented by a love affair with his uncle's wife, travels from the caves of Tasmania Trappists in the early 20th century to a beachfront hotel that crumbles before the war, from a prison of the jungle in Thailand at a Japanese snow festival, from the Changi gallows to a casual gathering of lovers at the Sydney Harbor Bridge.

Read it For:
The book is obviously well studied. It has all the characteristics of a work of the great class, literary and important on love, war, good, evil, the resistance of the human spirit, etc. Etc.
Don't Read it For:
While there are passages of intensity, vigour and simple beauty, there are also sections of gross, overwritten, melodramatic and obvious prose. And some of the descriptions of women are terribly bad.
What makes this book stand out?:
Taking the title from the travel diary of the seventeenth-century haiku poet, Basho, the narrow path in the deep north is about the impossibility of love. In his heart is a day in a Japanese forced labour camp in August 1943. As the day unfolds for his horrible climax, Dorrigo Evans struggles and fails in his quest to save the lives of his war mates, an L man is killed for no reason, and a love story develops.
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True History of the Kelly Gang

In the True History of Kelly Gang, the legendary Ned Kelly speaks for himself, doodling his narrative on loose pieces of paper in semi-literacy but in magically descriptive prose as he escapes from the police. For his persecutors, Kelly is nothing but a monstrous criminal, a thief and a murderer. For his people, the humble class of Australian municipalities, the bushranger is a hero, challenging the authority of the British to direct their lives. Hired by his mother of smuggling to a famous horse thief (who was also his lover), Ned saw his first cell at 15 and, at the age of 26, he became the most wanted man in the wild Victoria colony, taking whole cities and challenging the law until it was finally caught and hanged.

Read it For:
This book is wonderful. It is interesting that it can be so effective when its artifice is so obvious.
Don't Read it For:
The story has been really interesting, but the books in which the language / the jargon are so biased and almost illiterate make it difficult to pass through the pages.
What makes this book stand out?:
This novel won Peter Carey the Booker Prize in 2001. Here is a classic story of outlaws, made alive by the skill of a great novelist.

Cloudstreet

struggling to rebuild their lives after being hit by a disaster, the Pickle family, who inherited a large house called Cloudstreet in a suburb of Perth, accepts God-fearing tenants as tenants. The lambs have suffered their own catastrophes and, determined to survive, open a store on the ground floor. From the year 1944 to 1964, the shared experiences of the two overpopulated clans - ranging from drunkenness, adultery and death to resurrection, marriage and birth - link them together and the animated and bewitched house in ways that no one could have anticipated.

Read it For:
The book is written in short sections of each of the characters' points of view. They can be shorter than one paragraph or several pages
Don't Read it For:
The lack of vocal labels in the book made it difficult to know what character he was talking about and when.
What makes this book stand out?:
Highly acclaimed as a classic, Tim Winton's family saga is a hymn to working-class Australians and a constant examination of the human heart's ability to be sad, joyful and infinite intermediate gradations. An award-winning work, Cloudstreet exemplifies the brilliant ability of the narrative to fascinate and inspire.

Jasper Jones

Later, on a hot summer night in 1965, Charlie Bucktin, a precocious child and a thirteen-year-old librettist, was surprised by an urgent knock at the window of his dream. Your visitor is Jasper Jones, a pariah in the regional mining town of Corrigan. Rebel, half-breed and lonely, Jasper is a distant figure of danger and intrigue for Charlie. Then, when Jasper asks for his help, Charlie pulls anxiously into the night by his side, terribly frightened but desperate to impress. Jasper takes him to his secret in the woods, and it is here that Charlie witnesses the horrible discovery of Jasper. With his secret as a brick in his belly, Charlie is pushed and pushed by a city that closes on itself with fear and suspicion while it binds its horns with its stormy mother; he falls in love and struggles nervously to keep his jealous best friend at bay, Jeffrey Lu. And in vain he tries to restore the parts that have been shaken, Charlie learns to discern the truth of the myth, and why white lies crawl like a curse. In the hot summer, where everything changes, Charlie finds out why the truth of things is so hard to know and even harder to keep in his heart.Jasper Jones is a true soul player. It's a good book, about growing and discovering things about ourselves and others. It is a book of good friendships, strong friendships and unconditional friendships.

Read it For:
Jasper Jones is a true soul player. It's a good book, about growing and discovering things about ourselves and others. It is a book of good friendships, strong friendships and unconditional friendships.
Don't Read it For:
This story is based in Australia and told from the point of view of Charlie Bucktin. It started slowly, and I felt that the pace did not increase too much. It had pages of descriptive details that had no meaning to the story and became a bit boring when I read.
What makes this book stand out?:
This is so typically Australian, a true story of reaching the age of majority. This book transports us in time to a small rural town in Western Australia during a hot summer set in 1965.

Carpentaria

Hailed as a "literary case" by the New York Times Book Review, Carpentaria is the bright, winning novel by Australian writer and Aboriginal activist Alexis Wright. Alexis Wright employs mysticism, raw reality and imagination have shown to recreate the land and the natives of Carpentaria. In the sparsely populated city of Esperance in northern Queensland, loyalty is deep, and lines of battle have been established between the powerful ghost family, the Prickle bush West end people's leaders and the Easton rebel crowd of Joseph Midnight, and their disputes with white officials from neighbouring cities. Immersed in myth and magical realism, hypnotic tale Wright exposes the tearing realities of native life. In turn, operatic and every day, surreal and sensational, the novel is full of, bigger than extraordinary characters of life. From El Salvador Elias Smith outlaws, religious fanatical killer Mossie Fishman and Mayor Will Bruiser to Phantom and Phantom Normal activists, ruler of the family, these unforgettable characters transcend their situation and hypotheses challenge on the "other" trampled. Trapped between politics and principles, past and present, the indigenous tribes struggle to protect their natural resources, sacred sites and above all their people.

Read it For:
The story has an epic extension of over 500 pages and, although it takes place in a remote and small place, it is also epic in scope, as it deals with society on many levels, including business, politics, religion, culture and law
Don't Read it For:
This is overwhelmingly a book about men. It is the white men who commit the worst crimes against the earth and other people in the novel; they are the aborigines who protest, undermine and survive what happens
What makes this book stand out?:
An international bestseller, Carpentaria has collected praise from everyone.

Burial Rites

A brilliant literary debut, inspired by a true story: the last days of a young woman accused of murder in Iceland in 1829. In contrast to the austere Icelandic landscape, Hannah Kent brings to life the story of Agnes, who, accused of the brutal murder of her former teacher, is sent to an isolated farm waiting to be executed. Horrified at the prospect of hosting a convicted murderer, the family initially avoided Agnese. Only Tóti, a priest whom Ines mysteriously chose to be his spiritual guardian, tries to understand her. But when Agnes's death approaches, the farmer's wife and her daughters discover that there's another side of the sensational story they've heard.

Read it For:
Writing is magnificent and fragile from the first sentence.
Don't Read it For:
There is no humour in this book
What makes this book stand out?:
Overflowing and full of lyricism, Burial Rites evokes a dramatic existence in a distant place and time, and asks the question: how can a woman hope to resist when her life depends on stories told by others?

A Fortunate Life

This is the extraordinary life of a normal man. It is the story of Albert Facey, who lived with honesty, compassion and simple courage. A child without parents who started working at eight o'clock at the rugged border of Western Australia, fought like a traveling farmer, survived the blood of Gallipoli, at the loss of his farm in the Depression, at the death of his son in the Second World War world and that of his  wife after sixty years of devotion; however, he felt that his life was lucky.

Read it For:
An extraordinary reading was. This story takes us on a journey of the life of Albert Barnett Facey.
Don't Read it For:
A very difficult to read the book because it was not particularly well written, but an incredible life story that makes me feel sadly inadequate.
What makes this book stand out?:
The story of the life of Facey, published when he was eighty-seven years old, has inspired many plays, a television series and an award-winning book that has sold over half a million copies.

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