Top 15 Books by C. S. Lewis

 

Clive Staples Lewis was an Irish author, essayist and Christian apologist. Lewis is mostly notable for his works based on themes of Christian beliefs, questioning and fortifying religion, and the moral law. His works had references to the Almighty, the Devil, and spiritualism. Lewis was regarded as one of the best writers of the 20th century.

Lewis is famed his works like “The Screwtape Letters”, “Mere Christianity” and “the Lion, the witch, and the wardrobe”. His works efficiently illustrated spiritualism and his views on it. Other than being a writer, Lewis also participated in the first World War and took part in trench warfare.

The writer of world-renowned fiction such as, “The Chronicles of Narnia,” “The Space Trilogy” and others, C.S. Lewis is truly among the best writers in the world, whose writings have inspired us for years together. Several of C. S. Lewis books are known to be C. S. Lewis best sellers and among the best in the literary world. Apart from being a writer, he has also held positions at Cambridge and Oxford University and has contributed to the pool of knowledge there.  Here is a list of the top 15 books by C. S. Lewis which also happens to be the best C S Lewis books in order. 

 

The Screwtape Letters

If you have read many of Lewis' works, you will observe that he set up several letters. The Screwtape Letters has been set up around hell, portraying a Devil in Infernal Civil Services and his nephew, Wormwood, a novice demon as the leads of the plot. The composition is the most exciting and amusing account of enticement and overcoming it, ever written.

Read it For:
The book is C. S. Lewis' best book as it gives you a good dose of a laugh while you gain a deep apprehension of how the forces of darkness try to sabotage joy and the true.
Don't Read it For:
In the opinion of many, the plot is considered to serve as an absurd vituperation against humanity itself. Thus, the plot is a bit controversial.
What makes this book stand out?:
As you read the book, you are in an incessant self-contemplation of your own life, and the things that are put before you. C. S. Lewis has thought profoundly about the things we do that lead us away from God, and he vocalizes them pretty well.

The Problem of Pain

Through this composition, Lewis answers the most tormenting question of humanity — If God is so powerful, why does he make his creature suffer? Lewis also shares his hope and wisdom to help heal a world hungry for a true discernment of human nature.

Read it For:
The book is a really interesting composition with an affecting analysis of pain and the Christian response to it.
Don't Read it For:
The plot seems too controversial as it talks about religious beliefs that can become argumentative issues amongst readers.
What makes this book stand out?:
Lewis gives interesting Christian views on suffering without resorting to hackneyed comments. A worthwhile read, especially for Christians and C.S. Lewis fans.

Mere Christianity

First heard in the form informal radio broadcasts and then were published as three freestanding books, Mere Christianity is Lewis's forceful and approachable doctrine of Christian belief. It brings together what Lewis saw as the primal truths of the religion.

Read it For:
If you are looking for the facts about real Christianity, then this composition by Lewis does well enough for you.
Don't Read it For:
It may breed some disagreement as well as differences in the readers as this composition is like the other two.
What makes this book stand out?:
The book isn't just another about Christianity, it is a call to arms to every person who picks it up, irrespective of their religious belief.

A Grief Observed

This brief but touching composition was first published in 1961, with love, humility, and faith as its chief elements. It was written in the memory of Lewis's young wife and American-born poet Joy Davidman.

Read it For:
A Grief Observed is more like a collection of his profound contemplation. It's like an old-fashioned live blog as the reflections are so honest and raw.
Don't Read it For:
Many people in today's society may not be comfortable with talking about death and losing the beloved ones.
What makes this book stand out?:
The moments accounted in the composition are self-experienced by Lewis's himself. Plus, the book is heavy on spirituality and belief.
Shop Now - Buy 2 Fire 7 Kids Edition tablets, save $50. Limited-time offer
Bonus 25% off Fire tablets with Amazon Trade In. Limited-time offer.
Kindle Unlimited Membership Plans

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

Lucy is the first to see a mysterious wardrobe in the professor's mysterious old house. A wardrobe beyond which there's a secret country named Narnia. At first, no one trusts her when she tells of Narnia, but the other three kids and Lucy's siblings discover it as well and meet Aslan, the great lion.

Read it For:
Its the beginning of the Chronicles of Narnia, the part where the all adventure begins.
Don't Read it For:
The supporting backstories of some the characters are either unavailable or too confusing to be understood.
What makes this book stand out?:
Unlike Lewis's previous creation, the book plot is mainly fantastical and has the biblical references in the background of the story.

The Great Divorce

Lewis's classic image of the Afterworld, the narrator gets on a bus on a drippy afternoon and enters an unbelievable voyage via Heaven and Hell. He meets a host of supernatural beings and comes to some substantial recognitions about the nature of good and evil.

Read it For:
This book is a parable for heaven and hell and as Lewis describes each of the characters and how they ultimately choose their eternal reward.
Don't Read it For:
Again the text contains spiritual descriptions of other works of Lewis and grows some difference in readers due to religious beliefs.
What makes this book stand out?:
The composition is one of the C. S. Lewis's most popular novels. It's interesting and will make you read more Lewis's works.

Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer

In this collection of letters from Lewis to a close friend, Malcolm, we discover a cozy side of Lewis as he regards all aspects of prayer and how this unique ritual touches on the lives and souls of the faithful. Lewis gets us closer to understanding the purpose of prayer in our lives and the manner in which we might better opine our relationship with God.

Read it For:
Unlike his earlier creations, this is not an "argued" book, though; the subtitle "reflections" is a more minded description.
Don't Read it For:
This is not a regular C.S. Lewis book. It's not really theological in the sense of his other writings like Mere Christianity.
What makes this book stand out?:
This one has more of Lewis's intimate relationship with his friend, Malcolm and simply a collection of letters to him. Rather than some serious spiritual texts.

God in the Dock

Taken in from a miscellany of sources, the essays were planned to meet a variety of indigence, and among other attainments, they function to illustrate the many different angles. Here Lewis comes up to himself both to theological questions and to those who termed as "semi-theological," or ethical.

Read it For:
A collection of essays and letters by Lewis cannot be found almost anywhere.
Don't Read it For:
This collection of essays and interviews is dry, dull and at times repetitious.
What makes this book stand out?:
The composition is deep, rich, practical and provocative. A really good collection of theological and some sociological essays on a variety of subjects related to Christianity.

Yours, Jack

Yours, Jack features the best inspirational recitations, and sage guidance culled from C. S. Lewis's letters, offering an approachable look at this great author's image of the spiritual life. Most of these letters are currently only available in their totality—a collection consisting of three sizable tomes.

Read it For:
The full book consists of a collection of letters which Lewis wrote during his lifetime.
Don't Read it For:
The plot doesn't seem to be interesting enough. Even though reading letters are a lot like reading diary entries, but this one is more like reading a history book.
What makes this book stand out?:
Having read the Narnia and the Screwtape Letters, if you like C. S. Lewis books, and are somewhat interested in the author, then this is it, another bunch of letters containing spiritual guidance.

A Mind Awake

C.S. Lewis believed in the out-and-out logic of faith; his books, letters, and essays manifested the fixity of religion in his life. This collection digs their pages to bring out some of his substantive lessons and to showcase the ideas that provided the foundation for his philosophy.

Read it For:
An excellent composition of his sayings and thoughts arranged by topic. If you're into the quotation worthy CS Lewis, this piece is for you.
Don't Read it For:
If you're someone who cannot have enough of C. S. Lewis works, then it's not your thing as the text is limited and would leave you wanting more of it.
What makes this book stand out?:
An excellent exploration of Lewis' works if you are unfamiliar with the variety of his themes.

The Chronicles of Narnia Boxed Set

From The Lion to the Witch and the Wardrobe to the fascinating story of The Horse and His Boy, to a revolutionary Prince Caspian to the scintillating tales of  The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, this classic boxed set of the Chronicles of Narnia, has it all.

Read it For:
Want to read the entire collection of the chronicles of Narnia, then you sure have to get this boxed set, which is a treat for all C.S. Lewis fanatics.
Don't Read it For:
Not easy to carry it around.
What makes this book stand out?:
C.S. Lewis’s way of presenting a story to his readers is what makes this book unique, and a total stand out

The Abolition of Man

C.S. Lewis in this book, sets out to present his perspective on values such as honor and courage which are seemingly relevant and highly universal.

Read it For:
This book is said to be one of the most debated books of C.S. Lewis apart from being highly recognized and credited.
Don't Read it For:
Might spark a few debates.
What makes this book stand out?:
C.S. Lewis’s usage of appropriate correlations is what sets this book apart.

The Complete C.S. Lewis Signature classic

This book provides a beautiful compilation of some of C.S. Lewis’s classics such as Miracles, The Great Divorce, Mere Christianity and others.

Read it For:
Ideal gift for a C.S. Lewis fanatic, who would have a compiled version of some of C.S. Lewis’s all-time classics that will not only entertain you but also inspire and provide insights to you.
Don't Read it For:
Overall book quality might not seem that great.
What makes this book stand out?:
You get to read the best from the master himself, whose thinking and articulation skills are beyond comparison.

Mere Christianity

A book that will tell you all about Christianity and what actually binds everyone together.

Read it For:
A book that is thoroughly valid and relevant even after years of its original publication.
Don't Read it For:
Poor justification.
What makes this book stand out?:
A thought-provoking book indeed that will make you come back to it again and again.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: