Top 10 Books on Anthropology

 

The word anthropology comes from two Greek words: anthropos meaning “man” or “human” and logos, meaning “thought” or “reason.” Anthropology refers to the study of human societies and cultures and their development. Franz Boas is considered both as the founder of modern anthropology as well as the father of American Anthropology. It is basically centred around understanding the human behaviour throughout the world  their evolutionary history, how they behave, adapt to different environments, communicate and socialise with one another. Some of the great anthropologists of all time are Ruth Benedict, Margaret Mead, Marcel Mauss etc. Many great writers have tried to show the world the actual meaning of anthropology through their write-ups and stories. There are great varieties of the best books focusing on anthropology.

 

Guns, Germs and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies

The book evenhandedly reviews human history on every continent since the Ice Age at a rate that emphasizes only the broadest movements of peoples and ideas. It's a readable work on the human past that shows how history and biology can enrich one another to produce a deeper understanding of the human condition

Read it For:
One of the top 10 best-selling books on anthropology. It's well written and gives a deeper understanding of human relations.
Don't Read it For:
It's best-suited fir for anthropology students or those who have interest in it, for the rest the novel will be boring.
What makes this book stand out?:
A must read for all the anthropology student. It's well written and easy to comprehend.

1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus

A groundbreaking study that radically alters our understanding of the Americas before the arrival of the Europeans in 1492.

Read it For:
Very well written, a good mixture of factual evidence and narrative
Don't Read it For:
It's long and exhausting to read.
What makes this book stand out?:
A novel that fascinates you to the extent that you develop an interest in the field of anthropology even if didn't have.

Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed

The novel examines how and why Western civilizations developed the technologies and immunities that allowed them to dominate much of the world. A basic question put up by the writer is "What caused some of the great civilizations of the past to collapse into ruin, and what can we learn from their fates" ?

Read it For:
A beautifully weaved, intellectual novel.
Don't Read it For:
Very long and exhausting to read it whole.
What makes this book stand out?:
A must read to gain knowledge of the unknowns facts related to western superpowers

A Primate’s Memoir: A Neuroscientist’s Unconventional Life Among the Baboons

In this, Robert Sapolsky tells his own story.  Over two decades, Sapolsky survives culinary atrocities, gunpoint encounters, and a surreal kidnapping, while witnessing the encroachment of the tourist mentality on the farthest vestiges of unspoiled Africa. It contains very interesting stories of Sapolsky's multiple stays in Africa to observe the relationships and growth and maturation of baboons within their troops

Read it For:
This memoir is an absorbing account of a young man's growing maturity, and therefore a must read.
Don't Read it For:
It language is very basic and could have been better.
What makes this book stand out?:
The story is filled with cynicism, awe, passion and humour. The writer shows a hilarious writing style
Shop Now - Buy 2 Fire 7 Kids Edition tablets, save $50. Limited-time offer
Bonus 25% off Fire tablets with Amazon Trade In. Limited-time offer.
Kindle Unlimited Membership Plans

Kon-Tiki: Across the Pacific in a Raft

It's a classic account of nautical adventure which talks about five men who are in search of a mythical hero(Kon-Tiki) for which they journey from Peru to Polynesia.

Read it For:
It's an enriched classic edition containing Critical analysis, including contemporary and modern perspectives on the work
Don't Read it For:
It could have been made more interesting and indulging.
What makes this book stand out?:
A well-written story, with detailed explanatory notes and a style which is unique.

The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures

It's a story of Lia Lee who  soon develops symptoms of epilepsy. She was living at home but had been brain dead after a tragic cycle of misunderstanding, over-medication, and culture clash. It's a tragedy of Shakespearean dimensions, written with the deepest of human feeling. An insightful story which helped others to understand different perspectives and approach to understand different cultures with compassion instead of judgment.

Read it For:
A very raw novel with no villains or heroes. People are presented as she saw them, in their humility and their frailty--and their nobility. It moves a little slow as you move ahead in the story.
Don't Read it For:
A heartbroken story, beautifully and compassionately written. You feel for absolutely everyone in the story.

The Third Chimpanzee: The Evolution and Future of the Human Animal

The theme of the book is "How the human species changed, within a short time, from just another species of big mammal to a world conqueror; and how we acquired the capacity to reverse all that progress overnight".

Read it For:
It helps us understand what it means to be human.
Don't Read it For:
Long and stretched.
What makes this book stand out?:
A great read, very informative and interesting

Don’t Sleep; There are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle

An account of the astonishing experiences and discoveries made by linguist Daniel Everett while he lived with the Pirahã, a small tribe of Amazonian Indians in central Brazil. It's rich with unparalleled insight into the nature of language, though, and life itself

Read it For:
The story is written with extraordinary acuity, sensitivity, and openness, it is fascinating from the first to last chapter.
Don't Read it For:
Some of the linguistics discussion was difficult to follow but interesting.
What makes this book stand out?:
Very well written anthropology and an adventurous book.

Cannibals and Kings: Origins of Cultures

In this brilliant and profound study the distinguished American anthropologist Marvin Harris shows how the endless varieties of cultural behaviour can be explained as adaptations to particular ecological conditions. It's an original and urgent theory about the nature of man and at the reason that human cultures take so many diverse shapes.

Read it For:
A very amazing and fascinating novel in every way imaginable.
Don't Read it For:
It could have been a shorter.
What makes this book stand out?:
A very interesting to read the novel, keeps you engaged throughout.

The Naked Ape: A Zoologist’s Study of the Human Animal

There's is the Naked Ape at his most primal in love, at work, at war. The Naked Ape takes its place alongside Darwin’s Origin of the Species, presenting man not as a fallen angel, but as a risen ape, remarkable in his resilience, energy and imagination, yet an animal nonetheless, in danger of forgetting his origins

Read it For:
It has an interdisciplinary approach to analyzing modern society.
Don't Read it For:
Dialogue writing is dry and not properly taken care of.
What makes this book stand out?:
Enjoy his writing style and insights, Very insightful
%d bloggers like this: