The Doll People

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Number of Pages
288
Publication year
2003
Book Rating
4.03/5 (13289 ratings)

About

This book is about the Doll family and the Funcraft family – one a bit traditional and old-school, the other modern and fun-loving. Annabelle is the protagonist who is an 8-year-old member of the Doll family and has been so for like a century. When she finally finds her long-lost aunt Sarah’s diary, her family wants to stop her from all these discoveries, but she is adamant.

Nothing has changed from the dollhouse but for the fact that Annabelle's Auntie Sarah vanished with no hint from the dollhouse, throughout that time. Restless Annabelle is growing more and more about her aunt's destiny. When Auntie Sarah journal is discovered by her, she becomes pushed. Her family attempts to dissuade her, but Annabelle will not be stopped, although she dangers Permanent Doll Condition, where she could become a doll that is nonliving. When the"Actual Pink Plastic" Funcraft family moves in next door, the Doll family's entire world is turned upside downin more ways than you! Fans of Stuart Little and The Borrowers will adore this tale of puzzle and adventure. 1 classic, the association between both doll households, one contemporary, is beautifully drawn. The Funcrafts are raucous and reckless, with fearlessness made of the components that are unbreakable. The Doll household is booked and somewhat prim, despite the fact that they sometimes break into'60s songs like"Respect" within their sing-alongs. Annabelle is a heroine with gumption and ethics. Ann Martin (The Babysitters Club series) and Laura Godwin make a witty, interesting narrative, illustrated with comedy and a smart eye for detail from Brian Selznick. (Ages 7 to 11) --Emilie Coulter

What makes this book stand out?

For portraying a female lead in Annabelle with integrity and determination and steel-strong conviction.

Read it for

The humor and fun in the clash of the two families and their bittersweet bonding.

Don't read it for

The name Annabelle always reminds one of the ghost dolls who keeps appearing in the horror movies, and it might not be a comfortable idea to have it in an otherwise fun and frolic book.

Brief about Author Brian Selznick