Stephen King: Books, Life, Career & Quotes

Birth Name
Stephen Edwin King
Born
September 21, 1947 at Portland, Maine, U.S.
Age
72 years**
Genres
Horror, fantasy, science fiction, supernatural fiction, drama, gothic, genre fiction, dark fantasy, post-apocalyptic fiction, crime fiction, suspense, thriller
Alma Mater
University of Maine
Occupation
Author
Gender
male
Number of Works
1511
Place of Birth
Portland, Maine
Social Profiles
Official Website
http://stephenking.com

About Stephen King

Stephen Edwin King was born the second son of Donald and Nellie Ruth Pillsbury King.

Following his father left them when Stephen was two, he and his older brother, David, were raised by his mom. Components of his youth were spent in Fort Wayne, Indiana, where his father's family was in the moment, also at Stratford, Connecticut. When Stephen was eleven, his mother brought her children back to Durham, Maine, to get great. Her parents, Guy and Nellie Pillsbury, had become incapacitated with older age, and Ruth King was persuaded by her sisters to take over the care of those. Other household members provided a little home in Durham and fiscal aid. Following Stephen's grandparents passed away, Mrs. King discovered work in the kitchens of Pineland, a nearby residential center for the emotionally challenged. From his sophomore year in the University of Maine in Orono, he wrote a weekly column for the college paper, THE MAINE CAMPUS. He came to encourage the anti-war motion on the Orono campus, coming at his position from a conservative perspective the war in Vietnam was unconstitutional. He graduated in 1970, using a B.A. in English and qualified to teach on the high school degree. A draft board evaluation immediately post-graduation discovered him 4-F on grounds of elevated blood pressure, restricted eyesight, horizontal feet, and punctured eardrums. He met Tabitha Spruce from the stacks of the Fogler Library at the University, in which they both worked as students; they wed in January of 1971. As Stephen was not able to find placement for a teacher immediately, the Kings lived on his earnings as a laborer at an industrial laundry, and her student loan and savings, with an occasional boost from a brief story sale to men's magazines. Stephen made his first professional short story sale ("The Glass Floor") to Startling Mystery Stories in 1967. Through the first years of his marriage, he continued to sell stories to magazines. Many were assembled in the Night Shift collection or appeared in other anthologies. In the autumn of 1971, Stephen started teaching English at Hampden Academy, the public high school in Hampden, Maine. Writing in the evenings and on the weekends, he continued to produce short stories and to work on books.

Best Stephen King Books - Critically Acclaimed/Notable

The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger - The Journey Begins

The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger - The Journey Begins

2011

DigBooks Book

Nightmare At 20,000 Feet

2002

The Dark Tower: Fall of Gilead

The Dark Tower: Fall of Gilead

2010

The Dark Tower: Treachery

The Dark Tower: Treachery

2009

DigBooks Book

Stephen King's The Dark Tower: The Complete Concordance

2006

The Dark Tower: The Long Road Home

The Dark Tower: The Long Road Home

2008

The Far Side Gallery 2

The Far Side Gallery 2

1986

Stephen King's N.

Stephen King's N.

2010

DigBooks Book

The Stand: American Nightmares

2009

The Stand: Soul Survivors

The Stand: Soul Survivors

2010

Stephen King Quotes

I'm not saying that you will, right off the bat, with no author experience, make the kind of money Stephen King makes. Achieving that level of success can take literally months.
In his notes, Schwartz comments that the tongue-twister dates to 19th-century New England and that it was often referred to as "The Drunken Saylor."
Alvin Schwartz presents a slightly different version of the tongue-twister in his collection A Twister of Twists, A Tangler of Tongues (HarperTrophy, 1972, p. 80):
William "Stuttering Bill" Denbrough recites this in IT (1985), but the line is not originally King's, as is often believed. It is part of a tongue-twister that dates at least to its publication in "Exercises in Articulation" in The Dayspring (March 1874), p. 39:
He thrusts his fists against the posts and still insists he sees the ghosts.
The first movie I ever saw was a horror movie. It was Bambi.
Lisey's Story. That one felt like an important book to me because it was about marriage, and I'd never written about that. I wanted to talk about two things: One is the secret world that people build inside a marriage, and the other was that even in that intimate world, there's still things that we don't know about each other.
Well, I don't like Dreamcatcher very much. Dreamcatcher was written after the accident. [In 1999, King was hit by a van while taking a walk and left severely injured.] I was using a lot of Oxycontin for pain. And I couldn't work on a computer back then because it hurt too much to sit in that position. So I wrote the whole thing longhand. And I was pretty stoned when I wrote it, because of the Oxy, and that's another book that shows the drugs at work.
The Tommyknockers is an awful book. That was the last one I wrote before I cleaned up my act. And I've thought about it a lot lately and said to myself, "There's really a good book in here, underneath all the sort of spurious energy that cocaine provides, and I ought to go back." The book is about 700 pages long, and I'm thinking, "There's probably a good 350-page novel in there."
These girls will remember this night for the rest of their lives. The music. The excitement. The beachballs flying above the swaying, dancing crowd. They will read about the explosion that didn't happen in the newspapers, but to the young, tragedies that don't happen are only dreams.The memories: they're the reality.
View all Stephen King Quotes

List of all Stephen King Books in order

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