Philip K. Dick: Books, Life, Career & Quotes

Gender
male
Number of Works
1046
Place of Birth
Chicago, Illinois
Social Profiles

About Philip K. Dick

Philip K. Dick was born in Chicago in 1928 and lived most of his entire life in California. In 1952, he began writing professionally and proceeded to write a lot of books and short-story collections. He won the Hugo Award for the best novel in 1962 for The Man in the High Castle and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award for best book of the year in 1974 for Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said. Along with 44 published books, Dick wrote about 121 short stories, the majority of which appeared in science fiction publications throughout his life. Although Dick spent the majority of his career as a writer in near-poverty, ten of his tales have been adapted into popular movies since his passing, such as Blade Runner, Total Recall, A Scanner Darkly, Minority Report, Paycheck, Next, Screamers, along with also The Adjustment Bureau. In 2005, Time magazine called Ubik among those one hundred biggest English-language books published since 1923. In 2007, Dick became the first science fiction writer to be included in The Library of America series.

Best Philip K. Dick Books - Critically Acclaimed/Notable

Dangerous Visions

Dangerous Visions

2002

The Collected Stories of Philip K. Dick 2: We Can Remember it for You Wholesale

The Collected Stories of Philip K. Dick 2: We Can Remember it for You Wholesale

2002

DigBooks Book

The Collected Stories of Philip K. Dick 4: The Minority Report

1996

The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch

The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch

2010

DigBooks Book

Ubik

2006

DigBooks Book

A Scanner Darkly

2006

Philip K. Dick Quotes

Is it real? Does it matter?
To call Philip K. Dick … a science-fiction writer is to the underscore the inadequacy of the label. … It would be more accurate to call him one of the most valiant psychological explorers of the 20th century.
The worlds through which Philip Dick's characters move are subject to cancellation or revision without notice. Reality is approximately as dependable as a politician's promise.
Writer X may sell 500,000 copies. All those 500,000 people may think, nice book. I liked it. I'll read the guy's next one. And 40,000 people may read a Phil Dick book, and be loud and vocal and persuasive about feeling the book had incredible impact on them intellectually and emotionally. The guy with the 500,000 will not be seen as a major writer and the guy with the 40,000 will. Because nobody's talking about the guy with the 500,000 readers.
It w
[H]e never went anywhere, and never left his house. I didn't realize what a big deal it was then, but the older I get, the less I want to go anywhere. We live in the mountains, on a dirt road, in the middle of nowhere. … He didn't like driving either. I remember he had a car for about three or four years before he passed away and it only had about 600 miles on it.
[He would spend] three days straight writing a couple hundred pages. I didn't get any sleep either because every ten minutes [he would ask] "How do you spell _____, I need some coffee, Is there any food?" …He'd lay down for about ten minutes, get up again, and write some more.
Philip Dick does not lead his critics an easy life, since he does not so much play the part of a guide through his phantasmagoric worlds as give the impression of one lost in their labyrinth.
There are no heroes in Dick's books, but there are heroics. One is reminded of Dickens: what counts is the honesty, constancy, kindness and patience of ordinary people.
Dick's fiction calls up our basic cultural assumptions, requires us to reexamine them, and points out the destructive destinations to which they are carrying us. The American Dream may have succeeded as a means of survival in the wilderness of early America; it allowed us to subdue that wilderness and build our holy cities of materialism. But now, the images in Dick's fiction declare, we live in a new kind of wilderness, a wasteland wilderness, because those cities and the culture that built them are in decay. We need a new American dream to overcome this wasteland.
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List of all Philip K. Dick Books in order

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